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Showing 1–36 of 1335 results

£250


The Interpretation
[London], J. Burns, [1889].

Sole issue. 8vo. Original pictorial wrappers.

An attractive and scarce little work relating to Rider Haggard's masterpiece of fantastical fiction.

£135



London, Walter Scott, 1899.

First edition. 8vo. Original red gilt-pictorial cloth.

A bright attractive copy of this mournful reflection on British society at the turn of the century, by a then well-known socialist, novelist and campaigner.

£1,250



London, George Redway, [1888].

First edition, second issue. 8vo. Original blue pictorial cloth.

A repackaging of volume 3 of the scarce triple-decker Dreamland and Ghostland (1888) which includes five of the seven Conan Doyle short stories found in that collection (the first appearances by Conan Doyle in book form, preceding A Study in Scarlet). The sales were of the initial collection were poor and the publisher repackaged the sheets in separate volumes with new titles and bindings.

£395



London, Longmans, Green, 1887.

First edition. 8vo. Original pictorial wrappers, bound in later boards-backed cloth.

Lang & Pollock's presumably affectionate parody of Rider Haggard's She. Lang (of the Fairy Tale multi-coloured books fame) and Haggard worked together on subsequent projects.

£250



London, Hutchinson, [1935].

First edition. 8vo. Original green cloth. Dust-jacket, priced 2/6.

A hard to find anthology in the original jacket; the collection includes contributions by Ambrose Bierce, Algernon Blackwood, Violet Hunt, Oliver Onions and others.

£4,500



London, Heinemann, 1958.

First edition, first impression; 8vo. Original brick-red cloth. Dust-jacket, priced 15s.

The first edition of Nigerian author Achebe's first novel, one of the BBC's '100 Novels That Shaped Our World'. Things Fall Apart is the first part of the author's 'African Trilogy', a compelling story of one man's battle to protect his community against the forces of change, seen as the archetypal modern African novel in English, and one of the first to receive global critical acclaim. It is a literary staple of schools throughout Africa and is widely read and studied in English-speaking countries around the world. Scarce.

£250

London, Chatto & Windus, 1893 [1900]. First edition, later issue. 8vo. Publisher's catalogue at end dated January 1900. Original green cloth decorated and lettered in gilt. A collection of sixteen unconventional tales from the pen of the author of The Woman Who Did, including the title tale set in Jamaica, and 'The Abbé's Repentance'.

Weird & Supernatural

Angus (John) The Homecoming

£750



London, Hutchinson, 1935.

First edition. 8vo. Original black cloth. Dust-jacket, correctly priced 7/6.

An exceptional first edition example of this the second work by Angus, a weird & supernatural novel based in 15th century Scotland - an unusual, haunting tale of sorcery, battles and murder. Very scarce especially in d/w, listed in Bleiler's checklist and Spectrum of Fantasy Vol. 1.

£85



London, Jarrolds, 1957.

First edition. 8vo. Original red boards. Dust-jacket, priced 18s.

A motorcycle tour through Switzerland and Italy to the continent of Africa.

£125



London, Dobson, 1963.

First UK edition. 8vo. Original dark brown boards. Dust-jacket.

Originally published in magazines between 1956 and 1958, with the exception of the closing poem, 'Rejection Slips', which was original to the collection.

£395



London, Jonathan Cape, 1970.

First UK edition (following the cancelled the US edition of the same year). 8vo. Original black boards. Dust-jacket, priced £1.05.

Ballard's experimental novel, comprising a series of interlinked stories or chapters. The book was going to be published first in the USA, but publishers Doubleday & Company had the print-run destroyed due to fear of legal action from some of the celebrities depicted therein.

£300



London, Grant Richards, 1903.

Early edition. Small 4to. Original pictorial brown cloth.

Helen Bannerman (1862-1946) wrote this story during a long railway journey in India, and sent it to her two small daughters whom she had just left to be educated in her native Scotland. It was eventually published as the fourth title in the "Dumpy Books" series, in 1899, and its success apparently inspired the format of Beatrix Potter's "Peter Rabbit" books. It is today quite a controversial juvenile, but since the original publication it has gone through countless printings and translations as well as sequels, imitations, and parodies.

£80



Penyffordd, Chester, Ash-Tree Press, 1996.

One of 400 copies. 8vo. Original dark red cloth. Dust-jacket.

A wonderful edition of Baring-Gould's 1904 title, here featuring an introduction by Richard Dalby.

£75



London, Chatto & Windus, 1943.

First edition. 8vo. Original brown cloth. Dust-jacket, priced 5s.

A very good first edition of this post-war prediction that seeks to outline the difficulties Europe in particular faces once the Second World War is over.

£85



London, Geoffrey Bles, 1931.

First UK edition. 8vo. Original grey cloth. Dust-jacket.

The first UK edition of this work by prolific Austrian author Baum, originally published in German the year before.

£575


A Journal of African and Afro-American Literature. No.16
Ibadan, Nigeria, For Mbari Club by Longmans of Nigeria, October 1964..

Small folio. Original pictorial wrappers.

An attractive issue of this seminal West African literary journal. Includes 'Four Poems' by Paul Theroux.

"The steady development of Black Orpheus over the last seven years amounts to a remarkable achievement. It has succeeded in breaking the vicious circle that seems to inhibit the development of a proper reading public by its continued existence, by its very availability; more than that, it has also gone on to establish itself as one of the most important formative influences in modern African literature.…It can be said, without much exaggeration, that the founding of Black Orpheus, if it did not directly inspire new writing in English-speaking Africa, at least coincided with the first promptings of a new, modern, literary expression and re-inforced it by keeping before the potential writer the example of the achievements of the French-speaking and Negro American writers." (Abiola Irele, editor, Journal of Modern African Studies). The magazine ceased publication in 1975.

£575


A Journal of African and Afro-American Literature. No.14
Ibadan, Nigeria, For Mbari Club by Longmans of Nigeria, February 1964.

Small folio. Original pictorial wrappers.

An attractive issue of this seminal West African literary journal, with cover design by Susanne Wenger.

"The steady development of Black Orpheus over the last seven years amounts to a remarkable achievement. It has succeeded in breaking the vicious circle that seems to inhibit the development of a proper reading public by its continued existence, by its very availability; more than that, it has also gone on to establish itself as one of the most important formative influences in modern African literature.…It can be said, without much exaggeration, that the founding of Black Orpheus, if it did not directly inspire new writing in English-speaking Africa, at least coincided with the first promptings of a new, modern, literary expression and re-inforced it by keeping before the potential writer the example of the achievements of the French-speaking and Negro American writers." (Abiola Irele, editor, Journal of Modern African Studies). The magazine ceased publication in 1975.

£575


A Journal of African and Afro-American Literature. No.15
Ibadan, Nigeria, For Mbari Club by Longmans of Nigeria, August 1964.

Small folio. Original pictorial wrappers.

An attractive issue of this seminal West African literary journal, with cover design by Jacob Afolabi.

"The steady development of Black Orpheus over the last seven years amounts to a remarkable achievement. It has succeeded in breaking the vicious circle that seems to inhibit the development of a proper reading public by its continued existence, by its very availability; more than that, it has also gone on to establish itself as one of the most important formative influences in modern African literature.…It can be said, without much exaggeration, that the founding of Black Orpheus, if it did not directly inspire new writing in English-speaking Africa, at least coincided with the first promptings of a new, modern, literary expression and re-inforced it by keeping before the potential writer the example of the achievements of the French-speaking and Negro American writers." (Abiola Irele, editor, Journal of Modern African Studies). The magazine ceased publication in 1975.

£575


A Journal of African and Afro-American Literature. No.4
Ibadan, Nigeria, General Publications Section, Ministry of Education, October 1958.

Small folio. Original pictorial wrappers.

An early issue of this seminal West African literary journal, contributors include Paul Vesey, Gerald Moore, Ezekiel Mpahlele, Geormbeeyi Adali-Mortti and Randolph Rawlins.

"The steady development of Black Orpheus over the last seven years amounts to a remarkable achievement. It has succeeded in breaking the vicious circle that seems to inhibit the development of a proper reading public by its continued existence, by its very availability; more than that, it has also gone on to establish itself as one of the most important formative influences in modern African literature.…It can be said, without much exaggeration, that the founding of Black Orpheus, if it did not directly inspire new writing in English-speaking Africa, at least coincided with the first promptings of a new, modern, literary expression and re-inforced it by keeping before the potential writer the example of the achievements of the French-speaking and Negro American writers." (Abiola Irele, editor, Journal of Modern African Studies). The magazine ceased publication in 1975.

£575


A Journal of African and Afro-American Literature. No.10
Ibadan, Nigeria, General Publications Section, Ministry of Education, [1962].

Small folio. US distributor's label to copyright page. Original pictorial wrappers.

An attractive issue of this seminal West African literary journal. Includes a section on 'New Nigerian Poetry'.

"The steady development of Black Orpheus over the last seven years amounts to a remarkable achievement. It has succeeded in breaking the vicious circle that seems to inhibit the development of a proper reading public by its continued existence, by its very availability; more than that, it has also gone on to establish itself as one of the most important formative influences in modern African literature.…It can be said, without much exaggeration, that the founding of Black Orpheus, if it did not directly inspire new writing in English-speaking Africa, at least coincided with the first promptings of a new, modern, literary expression and re-inforced it by keeping before the potential writer the example of the achievements of the French-speaking and Negro American writers." (Abiola Irele, editor, Journal of Modern African Studies). The magazine ceased publication in 1975.

£575


A Journal of African and Afro-American Literature. No.9
Ibadan, Nigeria, General Publications Section, Ministry of Education, June 1961.

Small folio. Original pictorial wrappers.

An early issue of this seminal West African literary journal. Includes Ezekiel Mphahlele writing on Langston Hughes.

"The steady development of Black Orpheus over the last seven years amounts to a remarkable achievement. It has succeeded in breaking the vicious circle that seems to inhibit the development of a proper reading public by its continued existence, by its very availability; more than that, it has also gone on to establish itself as one of the most important formative influences in modern African literature.…It can be said, without much exaggeration, that the founding of Black Orpheus, if it did not directly inspire new writing in English-speaking Africa, at least coincided with the first promptings of a new, modern, literary expression and re-inforced it by keeping before the potential writer the example of the achievements of the French-speaking and Negro American writers." (Abiola Irele, editor, Journal of Modern African Studies). The magazine ceased publication in 1975.

£575


A Journal of African and Afro-American Literature. No.7
Ibadan, Nigeria, General Publications Section, Ministry of Education, June 1960.

Small folio. Original pictorial wrappers.

An early issue of this seminal West African literary journal, contributors include Léon Damas, Gerald Moore and Cyprian Ekwensi.

"The steady development of Black Orpheus over the last seven years amounts to a remarkable achievement. It has succeeded in breaking the vicious circle that seems to inhibit the development of a proper reading public by its continued existence, by its very availability; more than that, it has also gone on to establish itself as one of the most important formative influences in modern African literature.…It can be said, without much exaggeration, that the founding of Black Orpheus, if it did not directly inspire new writing in English-speaking Africa, at least coincided with the first promptings of a new, modern, literary expression and re-inforced it by keeping before the potential writer the example of the achievements of the French-speaking and Negro American writers." (Abiola Irele, editor, Journal of Modern African Studies). The magazine ceased publication in 1975.

£575


A Journal of African and Afro-American Literature. No.11
Ibadan, Nigeria, General Publications Section, Ministry of Education, [1962].

Small folio. US distributor's label to copyright page. Original pictorial wrappers.

An attractive issue of this seminal West African literary journal.

"The steady development of Black Orpheus over the last seven years amounts to a remarkable achievement. It has succeeded in breaking the vicious circle that seems to inhibit the development of a proper reading public by its continued existence, by its very availability; more than that, it has also gone on to establish itself as one of the most important formative influences in modern African literature.…It can be said, without much exaggeration, that the founding of Black Orpheus, if it did not directly inspire new writing in English-speaking Africa, at least coincided with the first promptings of a new, modern, literary expression and re-inforced it by keeping before the potential writer the example of the achievements of the French-speaking and Negro American writers." (Abiola Irele, editor, Journal of Modern African Studies). The magazine ceased publication in 1975.

£575


A Journal of African and Afro-American Literature. No.12
Ibadan, Nigeria, For Mbari Club by Longmans of Nigeria, [1963].

Small folio. US distributor's label to foot of title-page. Original pictorial wrappers.

An attractive issue of this seminal West African literary journal.

"The steady development of Black Orpheus over the last seven years amounts to a remarkable achievement. It has succeeded in breaking the vicious circle that seems to inhibit the development of a proper reading public by its continued existence, by its very availability; more than that, it has also gone on to establish itself as one of the most important formative influences in modern African literature.…It can be said, without much exaggeration, that the founding of Black Orpheus, if it did not directly inspire new writing in English-speaking Africa, at least coincided with the first promptings of a new, modern, literary expression and re-inforced it by keeping before the potential writer the example of the achievements of the French-speaking and Negro American writers." (Abiola Irele, editor, Journal of Modern African Studies). The magazine ceased publication in 1975.

£575


A Journal of African and Afro-American Literature. No.13
Ibadan, Nigeria, For Mbari Club by Longmans of Nigeria, November 1963.

Small folio. Original pictorial wrappers.

An attractive issue of this seminal West African literary journal. Includes '6 Poems' by John Pepper Clark.

"The steady development of Black Orpheus over the last seven years amounts to a remarkable achievement. It has succeeded in breaking the vicious circle that seems to inhibit the development of a proper reading public by its continued existence, by its very availability; more than that, it has also gone on to establish itself as one of the most important formative influences in modern African literature.…It can be said, without much exaggeration, that the founding of Black Orpheus, if it did not directly inspire new writing in English-speaking Africa, at least coincided with the first promptings of a new, modern, literary expression and re-inforced it by keeping before the potential writer the example of the achievements of the French-speaking and Negro American writers." (Abiola Irele, editor, Journal of Modern African Studies). The magazine ceased publication in 1975.

£75



London, John Gifford, 1976.

First edition. 8vo. Original red boards. Dust-jacket, priced £2.50.

A British travel group is stranded in France when the tour conductor is shot, and the bus driver is accused of murder. Luckily, Inspector Littlejohn is holidaying nearby and is on hand, both to interpret the annoyed tourists and to solve a baffling double crime.

£295



London, John Gifford, 1948.

First edition. 8vo. Original green cloth. Dust-jacket, priced 6/-.

Decent first edition of this early Inspector Thomas Littlejohn novel.

£195



London, John Gifford, [1949].

First edition. 8vo. Original blue cloth. Dust-jacket, priced 6/-.

An Inspector Littlejohn story.

£125



London, John Gifford, 1970.

First edition. 8vo. Original black boards. Dust-jacket.

Decent first edition of this later Inspector Thomas Littlejohn novel.

Weird & Supernatural

Benson (E.F.) More Spook Stories

£1,950



London, Hutchinson, 1934.

First edition. 8vo. Original orange cloth. Dust-jacket, price removed from spine jacket.

The first edition of this collection of 13 short stories by Benson, comprising: "The Step", "The Bed by the Window", "James Lamp", "The Dance", "The Hanging of Alfred Wadham", "Pirates", "The Wishing-Well", "The Bath-Chair", "Monkeys", "Christopher Comes Back", "The Sanctuary", "Thursday Evenings", "The Psychical Mallards".

£110



London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1931.

First edition. Publisher's file copy. 8vo. Original blue cloth. Dust-jacket, priced 7/6.

Evocative jacket artwork on this tale about a young man using his fists and heart to navigate his wanderlust around Canada & Alaska.

£175



London, Newnes, 1946.

First edition. 8vo. Original red cloth. Dust-jacket, priced 6/-.

A nice first edition of this collection of stories featuring the naughty doll Amelia Jane.

£150



London, Lutterworth Press, 1947.

First edition. 8vo. Original pale brown cloth. Dust-jacket, priced 6s.

Lovely wrap-around jacket artwork on this lesser-known Blyton tale about an interfering aunt.

£675



London, Martin Secker, 1964.

First English edition. 8vo. Original boards. Dust-jacket, priced 18s.

First English edition of the book that became the basis for 'The Planet of the Apes' films and the numerous spin-offs.

£175


or a London miscellany
London, Selwyn & Blount, [1930].

First edition. 8vo. Original black cloth with printed spine label.

Sixteen twilight stories of the supernatural, horror and crime, some reprinted from Curious Happenings (1917), an exceedingly rare collection not mentioned in Shadows in the Attic nor in A Spectrum of Fantasy 1 to 3.

£250



London, Odhams, [1919].

First edition. 8vo. Original red cloth.

A notoriously rare collection, including the tale 'The housekeeper', subsequently republished as 'The Confession of Beau Sekforde'.