Detective Fiction

Showing 37–72 of 75 results

£150

Mills and Boon, London, 1937
First edition

£120

early reissue (with '616' in small numerals printed on jacket spine), original red boards, very good, dust-jacket, rubbed at edges with some chipping and creasing, price and head of inside front flap clipped, 8vo, Ward, Lock & Co., 1935.

£295

First edition, Collins, 1941. Edwy Searles Brooks was a UK novelist who wrote under a number of pseudonyms including Berkeley Gray and Victor Gunn. This is a rare work from his canon. From the library of Anthony Lejeune.

Detective Fiction

Gray (Ruth) The Mouse

£975

First edition, London, Alfred A. Knopf, 1929. Rare London Knopf imprint, in the remarkable striking dust-jacket designed by Shaw.

£225

First edition.
London. Columbine Publishing Company, [?1940]
This is the correct first issue wrapper and rare as such. Titles published by this publisher are sought after due to their lurid jacket art of which this is a great example

£120

first edition, original blue cloth, dust-jacket, minor chipping to spine ends and corner, but overall a very good example, 8vo, H&S, 1931.

£150

Hodder and Stoughton, London, 1937
First Edition

£450

First edition.
London, Faber, 1937
A title featuring serial character Inspector Fenby. Born out of mutual antipathy, four bankers - The Murderers of Monty depicted on the front panel of the jacket - decide to create a company dedicated to the demise of an irritating auditing accountant.

£135

Featuring the Dormouse. First UK edition. Robert Hale Ltd, 1943. A 'Dormouse' thriller.

£110

First UK edition, Robert Hale Ltd, 1942. A 'Dormouse' thriller.

Detective Fiction

King (Rufus) Murder de Luxe.

£1,500

First UK edition of author's first book.
London. Leonard Parsons, 1927
Very scarce. Many of King’s books were not published in the UK.

-30%
£180 £126

Sampson Low, London, [1935] first edition A Jerry Scant title.

£200

First edition.
London, Newnes, 1935
A collection of fantasy short stories described by the publisher as ‘tales of the super-real rather than the supernatural, or if you will, fairy tales for grown ups’ Knowles was an Australian author who later settled in Lonson and wrote a series of fantasy story short story collections including The Street of Queer Houses and other Tales. Rare in dustjacket.

£225

First Crime Circle Edition.
London. Thornton Butterworth, 1935
Fabulous stylistic dustjacket art by Bip Pares.

£125


First edition, ‘7th thousand’.
London, Skeffington, [1932].

Skeffington often used ‘7th thousand’ label on title page to try and show that their titles were in high demand so this is not necessarily a reprint. A Hubin-listed mystery featuring the author’s serial character, detective-crook Jimmy Traynor.

£275

First edition, second impression first month as first state April 1935.
London. Collins, 1935
Stephen Maddock was a pseudonym used by prolific adventure and crime fiction writer JT Walsh born 1897 to 1952. He had two main series characters under this name: Inspector Slane and Timothy Terrel, the latter of whom appears in Conspirators in Capri. Very scarce in a jacket.

£595


First edition.
London, Herbert Jenkins, 1934.

Featuring series character Anthony Trent who goes man-hunting after a murder of a farmer and the sudden departure of a man and his wife but is also interested in the fantastic rumours of a strange creature - a ghastly phenomenon of nature - that was reported prowling about at night. Very scarce in a jacket

£795


First edition.
London, Cassell, 1935.

The Phantom Gunman is the author’s first crime novel and imagines what would happen if Chicago gangsters were to come over to London. Features serial character Mrs Pym. Exceptionally scarce in a jacket

£575

First edition.
London, Methuen 1922
A Hubin listed mystery in the very elusive jacket which has some visual similarity to the jacket design of ‘Mysterious Affair at Styles’, Agatha Christie’s first novel, published two years earlier. John Moroso was a New York based writer who contributed to various publications in the 1910s and 1920s and also wrote a story about life in an east side New York City ghetto titled The Stumbling Herd, which was made into a silent film in 1926

£250

First edition.
London, Blackie & Son, 1934
A rare Golden Age detective title centred on what happened to Simon Ewing at five minutes to five. Various people came and went and met face to face in his flat.

£375

First edition, Lovat Dickinson, 1937. A scarce memoir of the Spanish Civil War from the American-born novelist, Helen Nicholson (Baroness de Zglinitzki), who was caught up in the conflict while visiting her daughter and son-in-law in Granada. Nicholson and her family were unabashedly supportive of Franco and the Nationalist. Rare in this condition and with the added association of being inscribed by the author’s daughter in the year of publication

£495


First edition.
London, Selwyn & Blount, 1929.

The evocative jacket has minor edgewear and a tiny amount of loss at bottom corner of front panel, price clipped but overall an excellent example. O’Donnell gathers together a number of unsolved mysteries associated with the River Thames. Rare in jacket. No copies at time of listing.

£495

First edition. London, Heinemann, 1928 Fifteen episodes of crimes studied by Rowland Hern and his Watson-like unnamed narrator with strong supernatural content.

£200

First edition.
London. Cecil Palmer, 1931
Listed in Hubin.

Detective Fiction

Remenham (John) Arsenic

£150

Rare crime title, all other copies I have seen of this title are described as ‘7th Thousand’.
London, Skeffington, [1930 according to COPAC]
Reasonable to assume this was a publisher gimmick to show titles were popular.

£250


First UK edition.
London, Robert Hale, 1944.

Collection of short stories (here presented in the form of a novel) featuring Major Baruk, an Anglo-Arab soldier detective, most with Middle East settings. Uncommon in jacket.

£575


First edition.
London, Herbert Jenkins, 1940.

Inspector Shelley investigates a murder committed on the threshold of the home of a famous newspaper proprietor.

£795


First edition.
London, Herbert Jenkins, 1937.

Signed and inscribed in the year of publication to John Gawsworth on the front endpaper describing Suicide Alibi as ‘’not another little classic but it will serve!’’ Terence Ian Fytton Armstrong, better known as John Gawsworth, was a British writer, poet and compiler of anthologies, both of poetry and of short stories. A very scarce locked room mystery involving the shooting of a publisher in a room under observation (Adey p275) Very desirable especially with such a fabulous association.

£175

First edition.
London, 1937
a tale about the seething money markets of the City.

£325

First edition.
London, Herbert Jenkins, 1935
There is a skeleton in John Alloway’s cupboard that not even his wife knows about until Beryl Brady - the eponymous Gangster’s girl - arrives from New York with the key. Richard Essex (1878-1968) pseudonym of Richard Starr. English author, who wrote stories for the influential paper The Thriller which were recycled as novels. The serial character in the mysteries written under his pseudonym is always Jack Slade of Scotland Yard, formerly John Darrell MP, who drifted into the police force as a road from shame. His recurring adversary is the master-crook Lessinger. The novels written under his real name Richard Starr - such as this one- have no serial characters.

£495

First edition.
London. Collins, 1938
Fourth novel to feature photographer and detective Barney Gantt. Gantt finds his most elusive subject, camera-shy millionaire Jesse Jordon, dead and gets mixed up with the most obvious suspect.

£250

First edition. London. Wright & Brown, 1935 Set in Burma, the story concerns the British manager of the ruby mines of Mogok has been away, attempting to track down a leopard that had been attacking livestock. He returns to discover his stand-in at the office lying dead on the floor, the safe door open and its contents stolen. Very scarce in jacket.

£525

An Asey Mayo Mystery. First UK edition.
London. Collins, 1938
The first novel by the author to be published by Collins Crime Club. Featuring Taylor’s 'Codfish Sherlock' detective, Asey Mayo, introduced in The Cape Cod Mystery (1931). Very scarce in the dust-jacket.

£375

London, Columbine Publishing Co, 1939. The world-renowned detective Grant Rushton takes on his most sinister foe yet, High Priestess of the terrible cult of the Voodoo, Marie Galante.

£150

First edition. London, Rich & Cowan, [1947]. Collection of weird short stories hard to find in a such a nice jacket.

£395

First edition.
London. Jarrolds, 1932
A very scarce locked room mystery interestingly not noted by Bob Adey in his seminal bibliography of Locked Room Murders. James Harold Wallis (1885-1958) was the author of a series of novels featuring New York detective Inspector Wilton Jacks.